International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

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  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a UN specialized agency, established by States in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago Convention).
  • ICAO works with the Convention’s 192 Member States and industry groups to reach consensus on international civil aviation Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) and policies in support of a safe, efficient, secure, economically sustainable and environmentally responsible civil aviation sector. These SARPs and policies are used by ICAO Member States to ensure that their local civil aviation operations and regulations conform to global norms, which in turn permits more than 100,000 daily flights in aviation’s global network to operate safely and reliably in every region of the world.
  • In addition to its core work resolving consensus-driven international SARPs and policies among its Member States and industry, and among many other priorities and programmes, ICAO also coordinates assistance and capacity building for States in support of numerous aviation development objectives; produces global plans to coordinate multilateral strategic progress for safety and air navigation; monitors and reports on numerous air transport sector performance metrics; and audits States’ civil aviation oversight capabilities in the areas of safety and security.
  • Emissions from international aviation are specifically excluded from the targets agreed under the Kyoto Protocol. Instead, the Protocol invites developed countries to pursue the limitation or reduction of emissions through the International Civil Aviation Organization.

  • ICAO’s environmental committee continues to consider the potential for using market-based measures such as trading and charging, but this work is unlikely to lead to global action.

  • It is currently developing guidance for states who wish to include aviation in an emissions trading scheme (ETS) to meet their Kyoto commitments, and for airlines who wish to participate voluntarily in a trading scheme.

  • Emissions from domestic aviation are included within the Kyoto targets agreed by countries. This has led to some national policies such as fuel and emission taxes for domestic air travel in the Netherlands and Norway, respectively. Although some countries tax the fuel used by domestic aviation, there is no duty on kerosene used on international flights.


  • The Civil Air Navigation Services Organisation (CANSO) is a representative body of companies that provide air traffic control. It represents the interests of Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs).
  • CANSO members are responsible for supporting over 85% of world air traffic, and through its workgroups, members share information and develop new policies, with the aim of improving air navigation services on the ground and in the air. CANSO also represents its members’ views in regulatory and industry forums, including at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), where it has official Observer status.
  • Full membership is open to all ANSPs regardless of their legal status. This includes ANSPs who are integrated within government structures and departments. Members who are not separated from their governments are able to sign an article of membership which explicitly recognises that CANSO does not represent the national government of the ANSP’s home state in any way.
  • The Associate Membership of CANSO is drawn from companies and organisations from the aviation industry who are involved with the delivery of air traffic services.
  • Membership offers them the chance to network both formally and informally with clients, and decision makers across the aviation industry.
  • Associate Members may contribute to CANSO’s work programmes and help it improve the delivery of Air Navigation Services.
  • CANSO is member of the Air Transport Action Group (ATAG).

  • Airports Council International (ACI) is the only global trade representative of the world’s airport authorities. Established in 1991, ACI represents airports’ interests with governments and international organizations, develops standards, policies and recommended practices for airports, and it provides information and training opportunities to raise the standards around the world. It aims to provide the public a safe, secure, efficient and an environmentally responsible air transport system.
  • It is governed by the ACI Governing Board. ACI World is located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ACI works on a daily basis with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and is a member of the Air Transport Action Group (ATAG).