Introduction

  • Culture is the expression of our nature in our modes of living and thinking.
    • It may be seen in our literature, in religious practices, in recreation and enjoyment.
  • Culture has two distinctive components, namely, material and non-material.
    • Material culture consists of objects that are related to the material aspect of our life such as our dress, food, and household goods.
    • Non-material culture refers to ideas, ideals, thoughts and belief.
  • Cultural heritage includes all those aspects or values of culture transmitted to human beings by their ancestors from generation to generation. They are cherished, protected and maintained by them with unbroken continuity and they feel proud of it.
    • A few examples would be helpful in clarifying the concept of heritage. The Taj Mahal, Swami Narayan Temple of Gandhinagar and Delhi, Red Fort of Agra, Delhi’s Qutub Minar, Mysore Palace, Jain Temple of Dilwara (Rajasthan) Nizamuddin Aulia’s Dargah, Golden Temple of Amritsar, Gurudwara Sisganj of Delhi, Sanchi Stupa, Christian Church in Goa, India Gate, are all important places of our heritage and are to be protected by all means.
  • Besides the architectural creations, monuments, material artifacts, the intellectual achievements, philosophy, treasures of knowledge, scientific inventions and discoveries are also the part of heritage.
    • In Indian context the contributions of Baudhayan, Aryabhatta, Bhaskaracharya in the field of Mathematics, Astronomy and Astrology;
    • Kanad and Varahmihir in the field of Physics;
    • Nagarjuna in the field of Chemistry,
    • Susruta and Charak in the field of Medicines and
    • Patanjali in the field of Yoga
  • General characteristics of Culture
    • learned and acquired
    • shared by a group of people
    • cumulative and changes
    • dynamic and diverse
    • gives us a range of permissible behaviour patterns
    • ideational

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